Chinchoti Waterfall Trek

After planning for so long to go on a trek, we finally decided to start small with #ChinchotiWaterfalls in the midst of #Tungareshwar Forest. This place is so close to Mumbai and accessible from Vasai/Naigaon, it is a must visit for anyone who lives in Mumbai.

It is an easy trek for beginners, but anyone can get lost in the forest. You won’t really find markings on trees like most blogs may have mentioned. You may spot an arrow or two on small rocks but you can never trust them because due to the force of wind/water it could point any direction.

To get to this place, you can catch a train to Naigaon/Vasai station and take an auto to Kaman Phata and start your trek with the help of local shopkeepers/people you see in the vicinity.

If you are travelling by a private vehicle like we did, then you can park your car at this spot (check image below).  I had asked my cousin who has been to this place before to point out the exact location on map since on Google Maps it showed a route near Tungareshwar Shiva Temple and I wasn’t sure if there is a route from there.

IMG-20170908-WA00601

We had our driver along so it was easy for us to park and get off here. You can park anywhere in the field-like area, hopefully. From this point you need to go walking. We started from home at 6 am, so we were pretty early that way. We reached the parking spot around 7 am. The trek doesn’t start yet!

Here’s something no blog has ever discussed about! Dogs! Yes, as soon as you enter the trek area, you will be welcomed by 10-15 dogs who will not just follow you wherever you go but also try to pounce on you and fight with each other. We tried to get rid of them but couldn’t do anything. To top all that, most of us are scared of dogs. We asked locals for help to try and keep them away from us but they kept telling us there was no way really. They follow you right till you reach your destination and return with you. Apparently, they follow you for food which most trekkers here feed them. We bought a couple of biscuit packets and fed them. While they were still eating, we hurriedly left the scene leaving them behind but well, they still caught up with us and started walking around us while fighting and growling amongst themselves.  Pissed and frustrated, we almost gave up and planned to cancel the trek 3-4 times. We had already wasted around 30 mins going in and out of the forest. We tried one last time with the local shopkeeper and he gave us a suggestion. He asked us to hit the dog with a stick but we couldn’t do that for obvious reasons. So he did that on our behalf and asked us to carry a stick just to keep them away from us. So one of us kept tapping the stick on the ground and though the dogs still kept following us, they did maintain a distance. So finally, we started our trek, still afraid of the howling dogs!

Once inside the forest, we came across forks in our path a couple of times. We accidentally took the wrong path and eventually got lost inside the forest for a good 2 hours trying to figure out where to go. With the help of the compass on one of our phones, we tried to choose paths ahead. We could see paths where waterfalls would normally flow but were now dry. We saw huge rocks and ascended difficult steep areas of the forest and by now we were pretty clear we were not going right. We waded through huge cobwebs. That was a sign that people didn’t take this path for sure. We could see the falls far away across but didn’t know how to reach there. You know how the ways inside a forest can be. You may go north east but eventually reach north west. We were worried since we were aware of wild animals in the forest and that they did come out after 6 pm.

Now, there were just 2 dogs with us who weren’t of any help either. They never guided us and were hopefully enjoying getting lost with us. We did feel safe, though. So we almost for the final time disheartened, decided to head back home as we really weren’t sure where we were going.  Just then, a miracle happened! Like my husband calls this an epiphany! One of our friends spotted a local and we asked him to take us to the falls. He kept declining the help by saying he is here to collect herbs but after we offered him money, he agreed to guide us to the falls.

Already exhausted from the long walk, we took many little breaks and the dogs took power naps too along with us. It took us 45 mins from where we were lost to reach our destination, but the feeling you get when you finally see the beautiful waterfall is breathtaking. We craved that view so much and were so happy that we didn’t take the road back home without seeing this beauty. We had not planned to swim in the water but after the tiring hike, who wouldn’t want to take a dip? And such cold refreshing water! Be careful as the depth can mislead anyone. So enter at your own risk and be careful of water currents. A lot of drunkards apparently come here, so beware of tiny glass pieces near the  rocks. The extra pair of rain footwear helped us here. Don’t hurt your feet!

We were told that there will be many people being weekends but we were alone when we reached and after sometime we saw a group join in. So after a peaceful time in the water, we dried ourselves and had some snacks and water. We found a huge flat rock near the waterfalls, so we quickly settled and played a round of monopoly deal (card version) in the midst of the forest. After spending a good 2 hours near the falls, we decided to make our way back home. The return was now easy and it took us barely 45 mins to 1 hour to reach our car. So by 3.30 we were out of the forest and heading home. Mumbai traffic took us 3 hours to reach home, but that’s another story!

The last time my husband and I trekked, it was in New Zealand. This was our first trek here with friends and of course it was way different. From canceling the trek a number of times due to a dozen dogs following us into the forests to finally deciding to do the trek and then getting lost in the forest for 2 hours, and then finally making it to the waterfalls, it was one adventurous trek. It’s by far one of the simplest treks, but we complicated it by taking one wrong path that led to many other wrong paths. But to think about it, the best part of the trek was getting lost in the wilderness and the thrill of finding our way back!

So what did we learn from this experience?

1 – Always take a guide if you are not sure. We could have saved the lost time inside  the forest, had we convinced any one local with money to guide us through the forest.

2 – Ignore the dogs. Be stern with them to keep them away if you are not comfortable with them jumping on you. We fed them post our trek. Or go with a dog lover who can handle any kind of dog with ease.

3 – A guide wouldn’t really be required here. The trick to know which way to take when you see a fork is to check which path has more litter. This was the only place where we went hunting for chocolate, paan masala, snack wrappers and empty bottles. We were saddened by the litter in such a green forested area but since there were no arrows to guide, the litter was our only guide to know whether or not we were still on the trekking path.

 

Best time to visit:
– During or right after rains. Other times you may not get to see the waterfall. Just dry.

What to carry:
– 1 Litre water & 1 Litre energy drink like Gatorade per person
– Dry snacks like Chips, Cupcakes, Energy/Protein bars
– Bagpack
– Insect Repellent
– Portable Charger
– Cap
– Raincoat/Poncho
– Extra Pair of Clothes
– A Pair of Floaters/Slippers
– Sturdy Trekking/Sport Shoes (Saw many dead soles on our way)
– Hand Towel
– Bath Towel
– Personal Medicines and First-Aid kit. (I carried Odomos,  Alcohol Pads, Band-Aids and Pain Relief Spray)

What will you see inside the forest:
– Dogs, following you.
– Crabs, big-small-black-white crawling on the ground
– Spiders and Spider webs
– Wild Mushrooms
– Snake & Ant Hills
– Streams, dry and wet
– Huge Rocks
– And finally the waterfall!

Some Pictures:

It is a beautiful place for a day trek that’s and so close for Mumbaikars! Thank you Akhilesh Gupta (Husband), Milan Kakkad, Pawan Punjabi and Yash Thanawala for one great day!

Happy Travelling,
Divyashree Mangalorkar

Advertisements

SIMPLE TRICK TO WRITE MULTIPLICATION TABLES OF ANY 2 NUMBERS

There’s always a solution to all your problems and it’s no different with Math.

As kids or as adults, we do find calculating multiplication tables a little difficult, especially when the numbers are between 10 – 99.

Ofcourse, we always have a calculator or our mobile phones to help us with such calculations. But what when we don’t have access to those or are prohibited to use scientific instruments, for instance during competitive exams?

With this trick, you won’t have to worry further. This easy calculation will help you out. All you need is a pen and paper and tables between 2-9. Well that can be managed, I suppose!

So check this 36 seconds video and share it with people you care, especially children, since they need it the most! 😀

Do try it out yourself.

Happy Calculating!

Catch Pokémon For A Living Now!

“Wanted Pokémon trainer dexterous at finding and catching Pokémons.” That’s a listing on Babajob.com, seeking a Pokémon Catcher!

Untitled-1

The Bengaluru-based job portal has created a new category for Pokémon Catcher. It allows people to hire others to play #PokémonGo, the vastly popular augmented reality-based game, in their stead.

The company says that it expects this to become a trend soon. The job has currently been posted by Ash Ketchum. Pokémon fans will know that this is the lead character in the original anime series. According to Babajob, the company’s co-founder and COO, Vir Kashyap, is going to hire someone to play in his place.

In an email interaction with Digit, Kashyap explained that he and CEO, Sean Blagsvedt, started a friendly competition amongst themselves in the game. Kashyap however injured himself midway, rendering him unable to play. He plans to hire someone to play in his place, and the person will be paid Rs. 1,999 for reaching a particular level in the game.

The job posting states that the remuneration can go up to Rs, 25,000 per month. A sum that is equivalent to starting salaries for freshers in many specialised fields.

“One should be alert and swift. Also, the user should have enough knowledge about the Pokémon world to become a successful Pokémon Catcher,” said Kashyap, on being asked what the criteria for employment will be.

The opening is currently in Bengaluru, but the company said it has received lots of applications from across the country. The one selected will currently be going around Bengaluru, collecting Pokémon, and visiting other startup offices, which may appear as Pokéstops in the game.

It was only a matter of time before #PokemonGo opened up opportunities for others to earn money off of it. Interestingly, the game isn’t even officially available in India yet, although, the country is generating a hefty load off the traffic on Niantic’s servers. The website shows that many applicants have already applied for the job, and Babajob is currently reviewing the applications to hire a Pokémon Catcher for Kashyap.


I am a Freelance Designer.  Click Here to check my work 🙂

The Secrets of Victoria’s Secret you probably didn’t know!

This cult American lingerie brand is such a must have for every second woman around the globe, isn’t it? Supermodel brand ambassadors or ‘angels’ right from Heidi Klum to Adriana Lima, Miranda Kerr and Helena Christensen have become global faces!

But do you know where Victoria’s Secret manufactures its ‘Pink’ lingerie brand?

It’s manufactured at ‘Intimate Fashions Factory’ which is located at a small village in Kanchipuram district just 30 kms from Chennai in Tamil Nadu! Yes, India!

The women who work at the Intimate Fashions Factory, which produces bras for Victoria’s Secret, La Senza and others, come mostly from poor rural areas in India.

There are close to 2,500 employees (mostly women) working at Intimate Fashions. The girls make around Rs. 8000 a month which is twice as much as the majority of men in their villages who make just about Rs. 120 a day working on farms.

These young women are breadwinners! Not only that, there a positive social changes taking place due to these jobs. Girls, who were married off straight out of school are now delaying their marriages by three or four years.

On Intimate Fashion’s massive factory floor, hundreds of women in bright pink aprons and headscarves sit in long lines bent over their machines, busily stitching red satin ribbons and lilac lace straps as Tamil pop music blares out from speakers.

The conditions at Intimate Fashions is a major improvement for Victoria’s Secret following Bloomberg’s revelations that the company reportedly used cotton that had been picked by teenage girls under grueling conditions in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

Well it doesn’t end here. Victoria has another secret! Our homegrown Alok Industries along with its Sri Lankan partner, MAS Intimates, source close to 300 tonnes of organic, free-trade Burkinabe cotton for Victoria’s Secret. Not just that! This cotton gets shipped to India and Alok Industries spins 200 tonnes of yarn which is then made into fabric and sent to MAS Intimates factories for their other garments before it hits high-street fashion shelves from New York and Paris to London and Tokyo. Their involvement with Alok Industries has been strong since 2007!

After all this, Victoria’s Secret has just one stand-alone store in the whole of India. Delhi! So unfair!

Shhh…

Why does “Will Not” not become “Willn’t”?

Most contractions in English are pretty straightforward. The pattern of contraction for verbs and the negative adverb ‘not is very basic in majority instances. You first write the contraction, then the n of not, then an apostrophe, followed by the t of not. This is true for all of the following examples:

is not, isn’t;
are not, aren’t;
was not, wasn’t;
were not, weren’t;
has not, hasn’t;
have not, haven’t;
had not, hadn’t;
cannot, can’t;
could not, couldn’t;
do not, don’t;
does not, doesn’t;
did not, didn’t;
may not, mayn’t;
might not, mightn’t;
should not, shouldn’t;
would not, wouldn’t;
must not, mustn’t;
ought not, oughtn’t;
dare not, daren’t;

need not, needn’t.

There are only three of the most frequently used verb + negative adverb examples that don’t work like this: shan’t, ain’t and won’t. Let’s look at how they differ from the majority of examples and then try to understand why.

Shan’t is the contraction of shall not, ain’t is a contraction of am not and won’t is defined as the contraction of will not. Look at what happens when we add the negative adverb to each one:

shall + not (take away ll; take away o) —> shan’t

Now, you may wonder why aren’t there two apostrophes, since two letters are removed in one place and one in another place? Why isn’t it sha’n’t? The fact is that at one time as recently as the 20th Century, it was spelled as sha’n’t! Perhaps people who didn’t understand the role of the apostrophe “misspelled” it or brought it into line by copying the pattern of the majority of verb/negative adverb contractions.

In a similar way, am not was also spelled as amn’t instead of ain’t which later came into use.

Ain’t is a contraction for am not, is not, are not, has not, and have not in the common English language vernacular. In some dialects ain’t is also used as a contraction of do not, does not, and did not. The development of ain’t for the various forms of to be not, to have not, and to do not occurred independently, at different times. The usage of ain’t for the forms of to be not was established by the mid-18th century, and for the forms of to have not by the early 19th century.

The usage of ain’t is a perennial subject of controversy in English. Ain’t is commonly used by many speakers in oral or informal settings, especially in certain regions and dialects. Its usage is often highly stigmatized, and it may be used as a marker of socio-economic or regional status or education level. Its use is generally considered non-standard by dictionaries and style guides except when used for rhetorical effect, and it is rarely found in formal written works.

Amn’t as a contraction of am not is known from 1618.  As the “mn” combination of two nasal consonants is disfavoured by many English speakers, the “m” of amn’t began to be elided, reflected in writing with the new form an’t. Aren’t as a contraction for are not first appeared in 1675. In non-rhotic dialects, aren’t lost its “r” sound, and began to be pronounced as an’tAn’t (sometimes a’n’t) arose from am not and are not almost simultaneously.

I am doing good, am I not? 
–>I am doing good, amn’t I? (Earlier Usage)
–>I am doing good, ain’t I? (Present day usage)

What about won’t?

will + not (take away ll; take away o) —> win’t rather than won’t

The fact is that the contraction won’t was created when an older form of will not was in use. At different times and places “will” came out as wulle, wole, wool, welle, wel, wile, wyll, and even ull, and ool. From at least the 16th century, the preferred form was wonnot from “woll not,” with occasional departures later to winnot, wunnot, or the expected willn’t. Finally after years of change by our linguistic ancestors, “will” won the battle of the “woles/wulles/ools,” but for the negative contraction, “wonnot” simply won out, and contracted further to the “won’t” we use today. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, won’t was formed from woll not, an earlier form of will not. Knowing this, we can now set up our diagram of the formation of the contraction like this:

woll + not (take away ll; take away o) —> won’t

And we can see that it is formed identically to shan’t. So did won’t at one time have a double apostrophe as well? Yes: at one time, the correct spelling (or a correct spelling) was wo’n’t!

The verb “will” has been spelled all sorts of ways since first showing up as wyllan around 1,000 in Aelfric’sGrammar, an Old English introduction to Latin grammar. The Oxford English Dictionary has many Middle English examples of the wole or wol spelling dating back to the 1200s.

Now that you know the history, it should be easier to connect 🙂 

 

 

Interesting Facts About Evolution!

    1. Ultimately every living thing can trace its ancestry to a bacterium that lived billions of years ago.
    2. Bears, seals, and dogs are closely related carnivores but are on a different branch of the evolutionary tree than cats and hyenas.
    3. Some snakes have hipbones, which shows they once had four legs like lizards, their close cousins.
    4. Early whales had large back legs.
    5. Inside some whales and dolphins are small bones that show they once had back legs and that their ancestors walked on land. These occasionally reappear as tiny rear flippers.
    6. Birds evolved from dinosaurs and both are descended from reptiles. The closest living reptilian relation of a bird is the crocodile.
    7. Evolution rarely follows a straight line from species to species. Instead, it is more like a tree with many branches. Some branches lead to new branches, while others become dead ends.
    8. An elephant’s trunk is an amazing example of evolutionary development. It is a combined nose and upper lip that lengthened as the elephant’s ancestors became taller and their tusks grew bigger. With its heavy head, it needed an easy way to reach the ground.
    9. Physically, the human body seems to have changed very little in the last 50,000 years. However improvements in diets, increased lifespan, and developments in biotechnology may start to speed up the evolutionary process.
    10. All humans develop a tail in the womb that eventually dissolves.
    11. The penises of human ancestors were covered in hard spines. Theorists believe these spines possibly helped a man’s sperm overtake that of his competitors. As humans became more monogamous, the spines became obsolete.
    12. Charles Darwin did not come up with his theory of evolution while at the Galapagos Islands. His ideas came later, after his return from the voyage.
    13. Darwin (1809–1882) did not come up with the phrase “survival of the fittest” to summarize his theory. Rather, the philosopher Herbert Spencer (1820–1903) coined the phrase.
    14. Darwin did not argue that humans came from monkeys. Rather he wrote only thatmonkeys, apes, and humans have a common ancestor.
    15. Approximately 550 million years ago, humans had a common ancestor with a lancelet, a rod-like sea animal.
    16. Humans share about 31% of their genes with yeast, a single living cell that replicates every 90 minutes. They share about 50% of their genes with a banana.l
    17. A pair of parents would have to have 1,000,000,000,000,000 (a quadrillion) babies before they possibly might have a child with the same genes as any of their other children. This genetic variation between individuals is the key to how species have evolved.
    18. A descended larynx, which allows humans to speak, evolved roughly 350,000 year ago. Humans also possess a descended hyoid one, which allows humans to articulate words. In contrast, the larynx in a chimp, for example, sits higher in the throat than in a human.
    19. A hobbit-like species of human lived about 18,000 years ago. About the size of a 3-year-old, they lived with pygmy elephants and 10-foot-long lizards.
    20. The changes in a human pelvis that allow humans to walk upright also made bearing children unusually more dangerous than the rest of the animal kingdom. Additionally, the lumbar curve in the lower back, which helps humans maintain balance, is more vulnerable to pain and injury.
    21. A square inch of human skin on average has as much or more hair-producing follicles as other primates. The difference is that human hair is thinner, shorter, and lighter.
    22. Researchers believe that goose bumps are a remnant of thick hair that covered early humans.
    23. While other primates have opposable thumbs, humans are unique because they can bring their thumbs across the hand to their ring and little fingers. Humans can also flex the ring and little fingers toward the base of the thumb. This allows humans to have a powerful grip and dexterity to hold and use tools.
    24. The development of human clothes has influenced the evolution of other species. For example, unlike all other kinds of louse, the body louse clings to clothing not to hair.
    25. Evolutionary biologists hypothesize that species that cooperate rather than compete value sameness, which has led to right-hand dominance. Lefties constitute just 10% of the normal population; yet they make up 50% of elite athletes.
    26. Researchers suggest that the discovery of fire influenced human evolution. Fire allowed humans to cook their food, which made food easier to chew and digest—which, in turn, contributed to the reduction of human tooth and gut size.
    27. While most animals reproduce until they die, humans have evolved to survive long after the ability to reproduce. Scientists believe this has helped ensure the success of a woman’s family.
    28. The theory of evolution has three basic parts: 1) it is possible for an organism’s DNA to change or mutate; 2) the change is harmful, beneficial, or neutral; and 3) after a long period of time, the mutations cause new species to form.
    29. Mutations fuel evolution by providing new genes in the gene pool of a species. Many factors cause DNA mutation, including X-rays, cosmic rays, nuclear radiation, and random chemical reactions in a cell.
    30. In 1861, the fossil of a primitive bird named Archaeopteryx (“first bird”) was found in Germany. It has impressions of feathers and a long, bony tail. Scientist believe this fossil links birds and reptiles and was the first solid evidence to support Darwin’s theory of evolution.
    31. In the 1870s, Ernst Haeckel, a German biologist and naturalist, developed the idea of “evolution as progress,” which assumes that all nature is moving toward a final goal: human beings.
    32. The discovery of DNA (strands of hereditary material) provides the strongest proof for biological evolution. By comparing genomes of different living things and observing the changes in the coding of genes, scientists can figure out how closely different species are related to each other and identify how long ago a common ancestor lived.
    33. Modern evolution theory recognizes that evolution does not always mean progress. If the environment changes, more advanced animals can die out while less advanced relatives survive.
    34. Darwin was not the first to propose a theory of evolution. His real achievement was that he was able to present a more coherent argument for evolution backed up by a mass of accurate information.
    35. In revolutionary France, a theory of evolution (by Jean Baptiste Lamarck) was used to challenge the authority of the church and the king. Fearful of similar uprisings, England made evolution a scandalous idea.
    36. Scientists believe that the nictitating membrane (the small pink tissue in the corner of a human eye) is a remnant of a third eyelid, similar to the semitransparent eyelid used by birds, reptiles, fish, and other mammals. It is used to protect the eye or moisten it.
    37. Eighty-five percent of the population cannot wiggle its ears or control the Auricularis muscles that surround the outer ear. Scientists believe this muscle allowed human beings’ primate ancestors to move their ears in different directions to pinpoint the locations of sounds. They lost the need to move their ears when they started to live in groups.
    38. Scientists believe that wisdom teeth and the appendix are leftover “equipment” from when humans ate a primarily leaf-based diet. As the human diet changed, these appendices have become essentially useless.
    39. The term “Junk DNA” refers to regions of DNA that are noncoding—or, in other words, they do not code for a protein. Scientists note that evolution is messy, incomplete, and inefficient and, consequently, it results in DNA sequences with varying degrees of function or no function at all. In the human genome, almost all (98%) of DNA is noncoding.
    40. Hiccups may date back to humans’ watery ancestors. Wiring in the brain that pushes water over fish gills and makes amphibians gulp air has been imperfectly rewired in mammals. It can make the diaphragm go into spasms, which causes hiccups.
    41. Because of evolution, many animals lay hundreds of eggs each year to ensure that even a few reach adulthood. If all the froglets survived, the world would be knee-deep in frogs within 10 years.
    42. The platypus is the earliest mammal offshoot from the reptiles. It lays eggs but produces milk like other mammals. It also has evolved the ability to produce venom independently of its reptile ancestors.
    43. The plantaris muscle in the foot is used by animals to grip and manipulate objects with their feet. For example, apes seem to be able to use their feet as well as their hands. In humans, however, this muscle is so underdeveloped that doctors often remove it when they need tissue for reconstructing other parts of the body. About 9% of humans are now born without it.
    44. Humans have very little hair compared to other primates. Researchers believe humans have evolved this feature because 1) it made it easier to forage for food in shallow water, 2) it helped humans lose heat faster on the hot savannas, and 3) it helped reduce the number of parasites on the body.
    45. Human evolution has taken 5 million years. Modern man, or homo sapiens (“wise man”), emerged 250,000 years ago. Until 25,000 years ago, humans lived alongside the Neanderthals, who were stronger and more stocky. Scientists are unsure what happened to the Neanderthals.
    46. The evolution of the mammalian ear can be clearly tracked through fish, amphibian, and reptile fossils. Mammals have three small bones in the inner ear that began as the jawbones of fish. Over time, they changed form and function, shrank, and moved away from the jaw. This allowed mammals to develop a superior sense of hearing.
    47. Madagascar split from Africa 165 million years ago, which was before Africa’s large mammals, such as elephants and giraffes, evolved. Hence, elephants and giraffes do not live on Madagascar. Hippos are thought to be the only large mammals to have swum to Madagascar.
    48. Some scientists believe that if humans colonize other planets, colonizers would face new environment conditions, such as low gravity and oxygen. Over centuries, the colonizers and the plants and animals they took with them would evolve to look and behave differently.
    49. A panda’s thumb is actually an enlarged wrist bone that has evolved to allow the panda to hold onto its favorite food: bamboo.
    50. Birds haven’t had teeth for 70 million years, but researchers have found them in the embryos of mutant chickens. Researchers believe that chickens lost their teeth to grow beaks—although, they still have the potential to make teeth.
    51. Most people had brown eyes until about 10,000 years ago when a single genetic mutation from the Black Sea switched the eyes from brown to blue. Approximately 8% of the world’s population now has blue eyes.
    52. Researchers are unsure if humans are still evolving or if they have reached their evolutionary peak.
    53. A new species is achieved when two populations of the same living thing become so different that they can no longer breed with each other.
    54. Evolutionary biologists note that a symmetrical face is more attractive around the world because symmetry signals good genes for reproductive health.
    55. According to evolutionary biologists, women are more attracted to men with a large jaw and prominent brow, which are shaped by high levels of testosterone. Men are attracted to women with smaller chins and less prominent brows, which signal higher estrogen levels.
    56. One study found that men who were hungry preferred women with higher body weights. Researchers suspect this happens because of an evolutionary response to resource scarcity; in other words, a heavier woman advertises access to more resources, such as food.
    57. Historically, men prefer women with an hourglass figure. Researchers believe this is a product of evolution because the waist-hip ratio (WHR) serves as an indicator of reproductive health.
    58. Scientific studies have shown that blushing helps ease hostile responses by communicating that a person is ashamed or apologetic. Studies show that blushing elicits sympathy, which helps keep the subject alive. Humans are the only animals capable of blushing.
    59. Lip twitching when angry is an evolutionary leftover. It is the first part of baring teeth at an intruder and can also be seen in wolves, bears, and chimpanzees.
    60. Many people feel the urge to lift their feet or climb to a more elevated position when scared or feeling anxious. Evolutionary biologists claim this is a remnant instinct from when early ground-dwelling mammals would climb trees when threatened.
    61. Evidence for evolution is continually being gathered and tested; consequently, scientists argue that evolution is both a fact and a theory.
    62. The Tiktaalik is a fossil that shows the transition between a fish and a walking tetrapod. This “fishapod” had developed wrist and finger bones that enabled it to prop itself up on its fins. Holes on top of its head suggest it may have breathed air through primitive lungs.
    63. The term “evolution” dates from the Latin evolutionem, meaning “unrolling” or “an opening of what was rolled up.”
    64. Scientists believe that red hair and pale skin was evolutionarily advantageous in northern Europe because it helped humans to synthesize vitamin D more easily.

Knowledge, Experiences, Life

%d bloggers like this: