KONKANI STYLE OIL-FREE VEGETABLE PICKLE | NONCHE

This Nonche (Pickle) is a staple in Konkani households. I remember making this Pickle last year in 2020 and everyone loved it so much because it’s so different. What makes it unique is that unlike other oil based pickles, this is water based and therefore has a low shelf life. But if you store it well, they can last a long time. I still use it and it’s already a year old. Infact, just this morning I took the jar out and realised I had not shared this recipe, which is why you are seeing these year old photos now 🙂

Though this can be used instantly right after you prepare, I like to leave it out for a few days to let the Mustard release its tanginness and tenderise the vegetables, flavoring them inside out and yet stay a little crunchy. This pickle goes great with Rice & Datta Dalithoy (Konkani Dal) and can be eaten with Khottos too, which is a Konkani variant of Idlis.

Always use fresh vegetables for this pickle. The pickle will taste better when the vegetables are crunchy.

Being oil-free, it’s a great choice for all those who care about suing oil in their diet. I sometimes use this as replacement for Kasundi (Mustard Sauce) for my Egg Rolls! This is a Gluten Free, Vegan and therefore Dairy Free and also Keto, Paleo & Diabetic Friendly Pickle. Good for the heart and safe for those with cholesterol issues too! Just use this like a dip or a chutney and not a full fledged sabji haha. I used this today for my egg rolls!

One year later, looks like this ❤

INGREDIENTS
2 Cups Mix Vegetables (Read method for details)
1 Cup Mustard Seeds
15 Byadgi or Kashmiri Red Chillies
1/4 Tsp Asafoetida (Hing)
2 Tbsp Grated Ginger
Salt To Taste
1/2 Cup Lemon Juice
Water to thin it out

METHOD

  • Choose the vegetables you wish to make this pickle with. You can use carrots, cauliflower, raw mango, tindora, beans, green chilli, etc or a mix of all these veggies. I’ve used Cauliflower and Raw Mango only.
  • Wash the vegetables really well especially if you are using Cauliflower. I like to break the Cauliflower into tiny bite sized florets, as small as I can get. Then soak them in salt water and wash thoroughly ensuring there are no worms or dirt left behind. Drain them well and pat them dry.
  • With the Raw Mango, I only wash the exterior well, wipe it clean and dry before chopping them into small pieces. Raw mango should be fresh, crunchy and sour. The sour, the better. I do the same with Ginger, small pieces again. Drop these veggies into a pickle glass jar with some salt and mix well. Keep aside. Also make sure all the cutlery you are using is clean and dry.
  • You can use Bimbul (Tree Sorrel), Karmbal (Star Fruit) or Lemons instead of Raw Mango or when they are not in season.
  • With a little bit of water, grind together the Byadgi Red Chillies (Kashmiri works just fine, we want the colour and not much of the spiciness), Mustard Seeds, Asafoetida and a little Salt. The water used is boiled and then cooled to room temperature. This ensures longevity of the pickle.
  • Now pour this pickle masala over your veggies and give it a mix.
  • Also I’ve used a lot of Mustard because I don’t want the pickle to be too watery and want them to last a long time. The watery version which we Konkanis make don’t last more than 10 days in the fridge.
  • But a lot of Mustard also means it’s going to taste bitter and will be super thick. So to give a little extra tanginess and to further thin this out, I add Lemon Juice to this.
  • After you add Lemon Juice, taste and see if this needs more salt and add if required. Salt is a preservative too, so don’t shy away from adding what’s necessary.
  • If it feels too thick, that’s okay. Leave it out for 2-3 days or more (depending on the local weather conditions) and check everyday. Also smell and taste a little everyday. You don’t want this to rot. It wouldn’t since you haven’t used a lot of water, but you just never know sometimes. So always check. This will leave a little water on its own due to the salt.
  • But if you still want to thin this out further, then add some ‘boiled cooled down’ water or more lemon juice and mix well.
  • Transfer to the fridge and give it a few more days, until the tanginess of the mustard seeps into the pickle. That’s all!
  • This pickle tastes fabulous and the best part is it’s oil-free!
  • Do let me know if you found this recipe interesting and if you will give this a try! Tag me on Instagram divyashree_mangalorkar
Chopped, Washed and left to Dry
Thick Pickle
Pickle Masala
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PLANTAIN | NENDRAN BANANA FRY

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Plantains are a part of the banana family, but have a very different flavor profile. They have a much thicker skin and are also bigger, starchier, tougher and lower in sugar content than regular bananas. In India you will normally find them by the name – Nendran Banana, at Kerala Speciality Stores. It’s not difficult to spot one because they look different from regular bananas. They are longer and the edges are also pointier. The insides feel a little hard and not mushy. What I also love about plantains is the colour, which is a bit orange yellow like you’ve mixed in some saffron. They are also super delicious and goes without saying, they are highly nutritious as well. You can eat them just like you’ve eat a banana or you can try this recipe which my mum would make whenever we got these yummy versions home. I’ve added this to dessert category as well, because why not? It’s sweet and I think it’s a quick, healthy dessert fix anytime.

INGREDIENTS
1 Nendran Banana (Plantain)
1 Tsp Ghee/Coconut Oil
Red Chilli Powder
Salt

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METHOD

  • So these are not made from regular bananas but plantains which have a harder texture, so cooking doesn’t make them mushy. Read the top of this article and do check pictures I’ve posted for details on this variety of banana.
  • So first, we are going to peel the banana and cut them into halves. Now slice the banana into long flat pieces.
  • Line them up and sprinkle some salt and red chilli powder.
  • Heat a griddle or tava and spread some ghee all over it. If vegan, use Coconut Oil.
  • Place the side where you’ve seasoned facing down on the tava.
  • Now season the top side with some red chilli powder.
  • Flip it to let the other side brown too. Takes a minute on each side.
  • Transfer to a plate and eat it as a snack or a side.
  • You can eat this with some green chutney too.
  • The bananas are sweet and taste a little different from regular ones. The chilli powder and salt gives it a great taste. A mix of flavours 🥰
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Divyashree Mangalorkar Gupta
TRAVEL & FOOD ENTHUSIAST
6 Countries & many more to go
Mumbai, India

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CRISPY TANGY YAM FRY | SURAN FRY

Yam or Elephants Foot is a super nutritious tuber stem. A lot confuse Yams with Sweet Potatoes but one distinctive feature is that they don’t taste sweet at all. They have a hard rock like exterior and are firm and crisp from the inside (check image at the end of this post). They can be very itchy, so always be careful while handling this vegetable. With a low glycemic index, being gluten free and vegan, Yams are considered a safe option for those suffering from diabetes. The rich dietary fibre content present in yam aids in healthy digestion and the potassium content helps stimulate smooth bowel movements. With antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, it’s good for those suffering from arthritis and asthma. As an excellent source of beta-carotene and vitamin A, Yam helps improve hair quality and growth as well. It’s known for its anti-ageing benefits too. The list of benefits is quite long but remember that this amazing vegetable is a powerhouse of vitamins and don’t forget to make this a part of your diet, if this isn’t already.

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INGREDIENTS
250 Grams Suran (Elephant Foot/Yam)
1 Tbsp Mustard Oil
1 Pinch Asafoetida (Hing)
1/4 Tsp Fenugreek Seeds (Methi Dana)
1/4 Tsp Mustard Seeds
1 Green Chilli
1 String Curry Leaves (Optional)
1 Tsp Turmeric powder
1/2 Tsp Kashmiri Red Chilli Powder
1 Tbsp Tamarind Paste
1 Tbsp Coriander Leaves
Water (Optional)
Salt

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METHOD

  • Grease your hands first with some oil. Yam can get really itchy.
  • Peel the Yam carefully and chop into small pieces.
  • Soak in salt water for 5 mins. Using a colander, drain all the water. Also run plain water and clean them handsfree.
  • Using a dry kitchen towel, semi-dry the chopped Yam and keep aside.
  • In a deep pan, heat Mustard Oil.
  • Splutter Mustard Seeds.
  • Also add Fenugreek Seeds, Asafoetida, Chopped Green Chilli and Curry Leaves. Saute for a few seconds.
  • Now add the chopped semi-dry Yam pieces along with a little salt. Mix well.
  • Let this cook on a low-medium flame while stirring occasionally for 5-10 minutes, until they are soft and crunchy.
  • Now add Turmeric powder and Kashmiri Red Chilli Powder. Saute for a minute.
  • Also add Tamarind Paste. You can mix in a little water and then add to the Yam. Don’t skip Tamarind. Not adding this sour ingredient may cause an itchy throat.
  • Mix everything very well. Check for salt and spices.
  • Garnish with some fresh Coriander Leaves.
  • Serve hot and crisp as a side dish with Rice and Dal. Or even as a snack 🙂
  • You can also add in more water and Dry Red Chilli Paste and make it a little gravy like and serve with rotis or rice. We call this Surana Koot in Konkani/Mangalorean/GSB Cuisine. It’s on the spicier side.
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ABOUT ME
Follow my love for food, travel & more
USA, FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, CROATIA, NEW ZEALAND, THAILAND & MORE…

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LOVE . LIGHT . HAPPINESS . PEACE

Divyashree Mangalorkar Gupta
TRAVEL & FOOD ENTHUSIAST
6 Countries & many more to go
Mumbai, India

divyashree.mangalorkar@gmail.com

KADI PATTA | KARIBEVU | CURRY LEAVES DRY CHUTNEY

These tiny leaves are popularly used in almost every South Indian Recipe. They are so versatile and give a mild flavour to any recipe. We’ve all grown up listening to our elders tell us about the benefits of Curry Leaves for hair growth, eyesight and memory, so I’m not going to tell you about that. We all are aware of most of its nutritional properties, especially Vitamin A. They are one of the most potent herbs that one can include in everyday diet, yet most of us fail to do so, even though they are so readily available, in fact almost given out free along with vegetables you’ve shopped from a vendor at the market! Sometimes I get a lot of these leaves and since I don’t want to end up wasting a lot, I grind them into my coconut chutneys or I make this Kaddi Patta Chutney which my mum would make and store in dabbas. This is so so tasty, you can pair this up with anything; from rotis, curd rice to idli, khichdi or misal! So here’s a recipe you’ll find stored in most ‘Mangalorean/Konkani/GSB’ kitchens!

Continue reading “KADI PATTA | KARIBEVU | CURRY LEAVES DRY CHUTNEY”

SOFT & FLUFFY IDLI WITH RICE RAVA (IDLI RAVA)

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I still remember how my friends from school & colleagues at work would eagerly wait for lunch break just to gorge on these super delicious Idlis with Aai’s special stew and coconut chutney, that she would pack for my lunch. After I got married, she had given me this recipe and I’m so grateful for that. So here I am, sharing her recipe to make the softest and the fluffiest Idlis at home from scratch. Though it takes a days preparation, the effort is worth every single bite! So much better than store bought batter!

Continue reading “SOFT & FLUFFY IDLI WITH RICE RAVA (IDLI RAVA)”

CRISPY MEDU VADA

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INGREDIENTS:
3 Cups Urad Dal (Skinned Black Gram)
1/4 Cup Water or less
2 Green Chillis
1 String Curry Leaves
Salt to Taste
Oil for Deep Frying


METHOD:

  • Wash the Urad Dal thoroughly and soak overnight or for at least 5 hours.
  • Drain the water completely and transfer this to a mixer. I did this in 2 batches.
  • Add salt and very little water just enough to get the mixer moving. The lesser the water, the better.
  • Transfer this thick batter into a bowl and aerate well by mixing clockwise for a minute.
  • To test the batter, drop a small amount of this batter into a bowl of water. If the ball floats on top, they are perfectly aerated and ready to fry.
  • Batter that doesn’t float can turn your vadas harder in texture. There are 2 reasons why the batter won’t float. You’ve either added too much water while grinding or you didn’t aerate the batter well. If it’s the latter, aerate until it starts floating. For the former add 1-2 tbsps of Rice Flour, mix and aerate well.
  • Now, add the chopped Green Chillis and Finely chopped Curry Leaves and mix well.
  • Heat oil in a deep heavy bottom pan/kadhai.
  • Drop a small amount in the oil. The oil is hot enough if the batter starts to fry and float on top.
  • Keep a bowl of water beside you. Dip your hands in water and moisten them without any water dripping. You can oil your hands instead.
  • Place a small portion in the middle of your moist palm. With your other hand, flatten the batter. Make a hole in the centre. Transfer batter to the other hand (edge of your fingers) and slowly slide this into the hot oil, immediately retracting your hands. Be very careful of the hot oil that may splatter. Vadas with or without the hole will taste the same. So if you are not comfortable with this process, simply drop small portions into the oil.
  • Depending on the width of your pan, you can add multiple vadas at a time. I could handle a batch of 4-5 vadas.
  • Keep flipping the vadas for even cooking. Adjust the temperature of the oil if it is too hot. Once they get a nice golden brown colour on either sides, transfer them onto a paper towel and fry the remaining the same way, each time making sure the oil is hot enough and that your hands are moistened.
  • Serve crispy hot Medu Vadas with Sambar/ Spiced Stew & White Coconut Chutney.
  • Do checkout my Spiced Stew & Coconut Chutney recipe.
Roughly torn Curry Leaves
My Green Chillis turned Red in the refrigerator
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Thick aerated batter
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Moistened hands to prepare the vada
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Crispy exterior
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Served with Coconut Chutney & Sambhar Stew
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Ready to eat!
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Perfect Breakfast